© Stan Hema, Berlin

Museum of Untold Stories

In the exhibition "Museum of Untold Stories" the museum is turned upside down. In contrast to the traditional concept of an exhibition, which is usually based on a specific research topic and presents the individual aspects in a coherent sequence, this exhibition showcases a wide variety of different stories. A connection between these narratives is not immediately evident, but at second glance a common thread becomes apparent: for in this exhibition the staff of the SKD are sharing their own selected stories with visitors to the Japanisches Palais.

  • DATES 26/05/2018—26/08/2018

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This show, which brings together works of all artistic genres and periods, includes voices from all the collections in the museum alliance. It thus provides highly personal perspectives on the works of art that the members of staff deal with on a day-to-day basis; works which they restore, investigate or carry from place to place, and which are not usually on public display.

© Stan Hema, Berlin

Untold Stories

Untold Story | Kerstin Küster

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MUSEUM OF UNTOLD STORIES | Kerstin Küster

Untold Story | Jan Hüsgen

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MUSEUM OF UNTOLD STORIES | Jan Hüsgen

Untold Story | Dana Korzuschek

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MUSEUM OF UNTOLD STORIES | Dana Korzuschek

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For example, visitors can hear the extraordinary story of the objects from the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon which survived the aerial bombardment of Dresden on 13 February 1945, albeit in some cases with severe damage. They are presented in this exhibition without pretentiousness, in their charred and melted state.

But happy stories are also told, such as that of the goblin puppet from the Puppentheatersammlung which starred alongside David Bowie in the film "Labyrinth" in 1986.

Ansicht einer koboldartigen Puppe
© Puppentheatersammlung, SKD
Brian Froud, Jim Henson's Creature Shop, Goblin aus dem Film "Labyrinth", Los Angeles 1986

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The exhibition, which is divided among eight rooms, considers the role of the storeroom as the "interior workings of the museum", the gaps left by objects that were lost in the war, as well as the research conducted at the museum which has resulted in restitutions. One section is devoted to the aforesaid bombing of Dresden in the night of 13/14 February 1945, the traces of which are still visible on many of the museum objects. In the room entitled "retrieved, returned" the focus is on the post-war period: it deals with the removal of the works of art for safekeeping during the war and their return in 1955. There then follow three further rooms - the "Kunstkammer", in which objects from all the collections are exhibited together, each one being associated with an "untold story"; a cinema created specially for the film "The Labyrinth"; and a picture gallery.

Untold Stories

Jürgen Lange | Sammlungsverwalter Skulpturensammlung

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MUSEUM OF UNTOLD STORIES | Jürgen Lange

Michael John | Leiter Bau, Sicherheit, Technik

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MUSEUM OF UNTOLD STORIES | Michael John

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The unveiling of these previously untold stories and their unusual presentation provides a glimpse behind the scenes at the museums, thus opening up new perspectives on the objects and the numerous ways of interpreting art beyond purely academic investigation, as well as interrogating the role of museums themselves as representation spaces.

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