Fassade des Residenzschlosses, mit Menschen und Mustern bemalt
© SKD, Foto: Martin Förster

The Royal Castle

The Semperoper, the Zwinger, the Frauenkirche and in their midst the Residenzschloss, Dresden’s royal palace. Dresden’s historic centre is studded with architectural highlights, and today it is hard to imagine that the Residenzschloss was reconstructed just a handful of years ago. Almost completely burnt out in the bombing of Dresden in February 1945, all that remained unharmed were a part of the palace’s Historisches Grünes Gewölbe (Historic Green Vault) and the basement rooms.

Where Art and Science Reside

Until the late 1980s, not only were materials and finances lacking for maintenance and reconstruction, the political will for such an undertaking was absent in East Germany. This was in spite of volunteers and proactive public offices such as the State Office for the Preservation of Historical Monuments, the Technical University Dresden and the Dresden art collections themselves.

With German reunification came a reconception of the palace as a residence for art and science. In 1995, an international commission of experts recommended what today is reality: The historical and the new Grünes Gewölbe (Green Vault), the Kupferstich-Kabinett (Cabinet of Prints, Drawings and Photographs), the Rüstkammer (Armoury) and the Münzkabinett (Coin Cabinet) were to belong to the museums of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (SKD), and to have their seat in the palace, with exhibition areas, storage spaces and offices. Further publically accessible places are the palace chapel, the extensive art library, various lecture and study halls as well as (in the summer months) the tower known as the Hausmannsturm, which affords visitors who climb its 327 steps a spectacular view of Dresden. Visible from afar, the transparent dome structure which forms a roof over the small palace courtyard protects visitors in the foyer from the weather.

Impressionen

An Ever-Changing Palace

 

An Ever-Changing Palace

Every ruler left his own mark on the building: Under Elector Moritz, Renaissance influences came into play between 1548 and 1556 when Italian specialists were brought to Dresden to apply the elaborate sgraffito decoration, which may be enjoyed once again today on the façade of the palace courtyard. The latest historical redesign of the palace façades dates to 1889, when a Neo-Renaissance style was used. In 1701, a fire had destroyed the east wing and August the Strong developed a new design in response. But it was only for the wedding of his son in 1719 that the palace underwent its opulent Baroque transformation.

The audience hall, the parade bedroom and three other historical rooms are to be restored true to the original by 2019 to impress visitors – as was the intention 300 years ago when they were set up by August the Strong. At the same time, the small ballroom will be opened. The double-height space is akin to the Semperoper in terms of both its time of origin and its architecture. Using old construction techniques, it will be reconstructed in the historicist style and rendered true to the original. The 500 best and most resplendent firearms of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries from the holdings of the Saxon elector will return to the palace where they will be displayed in the Langer Gang.

Tickets

valid for Neues Grünes Gewölbe, Türckische Cammer, Rüstkammer im Riesensaal, Weltsicht und Wissen um 1600, Macht & Mode, Münzkabinett, Fürstengalerie, Hausmannsturm (April-October), current special exhibitions in the Kupferstich-Kabinett except Historisches Grünes Gewölbe

normal12 €
reduced9 €
under 17free
10 persons and more11 €
Audioguidefree
regulär12 €
under 17free
Audioguidefree

valid for Historisches Grünes Gewölbe, Neues Grünes Gewölbe, Türckische Cammer, Rüstkammer im Riesensaal, Münzkabinett, Fürstengalerie, Hausmannsturm (April-October) as well as current special exhibitions in the Kupferstich-Kabinett

Admission Fee21 €
under 17free
Audioguidefree

Our museums in the Royal Castle

permanent exhibition

Neues Grünes Gewölbe

More than a thousand other inestimably precious exhibits dating from three centuries

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Frau mit geweihförmigen Korallen auf Kopf und anstelle von Händen
© SKD, Foto: Pykado
The Collection

Kupferstich-Kabinett

More than half a million drawings, prints and photographs from the Middle Ages until today are being hold here

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Portrait eines Mannes mit Hut und Vollbart
© SKD
Permanent exhibition

Münzkabinett

The Dresden Münzkabinett brings together a collection of approximately 300,000 objects, ranging from antiquity to the present day.

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verschiedene Münzen
© SKD
Permanent exhibition of the Armoury

The Rise of Electoral Power in Saxony

The world’s largest collection of ceremonial weapons and costumes from the Reformation and early Baroque periods

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Dauerausstellung Auf dem Weg zur Kurfürstenmacht
© SKD
Permanent exhibition of the Armoury

Concept and Encounter: The World around 1600

Works originating from the late Renaissance from Dresden’s Kunstkammer form the focal point of this exhibition on the first floor of the Georgenbau.

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Objekte der Rüstkammer
© SKD
Permanent exhibition of the Armoury

The Electoral Wardrobe

Original costumes illustrate the luxurious princely fashions of the Renaissance and early Baroque

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Kurfürstliches Gewand
© SKD
Permanent exhibition of the Armoury

The new Hall of the Giants

Presentation in the Residenzschloss of tournament and ceremonial weapons and accoutrements from the Rüstkammer collections

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kunstvoll verzierter Harnisch
© SKD
Permanent exhibition of the Armoury

Turkish Chamber

One of the oldest and most important collections of Ottoman art anywhere in the world outside Turkey

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kunstvoll verzierte Schwertgriffe
© SKD

Location

Building

Residenzschloss
Taschenberg 2
01067 Dresden
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