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Gothic Sculpture in Saxony

The mediaeval works of art held by the Skulpturensammlung have been given a new home in the Schloßbergmuseum in Chemnitz. Along with the holdings of the Schloßbergmuseum, the Dresden works are on view in the cloisters and rooms of this former Benedictine monastery. The ensemble consisting of the monastery and the adjacent to Late Gothic hall church is an ideal setting for the exhibition. The two historic collections from Dresden and Chemnitz, whose origins can be traced to the date back to the Königlich Sächsischer Altertumsverein (Royal Saxon Antiquities Society) founded in 1825 and to the Verein für Chemnitzer Geschichte (Society for the History of Chemnitz), respectively, complement one another perfectly. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, these organisations collected and exhibited various objects including altars, individual retable figures and devotional images that were no longer in liturgical use in churches.

  • Heiliger Nikolaus aus Geyer, Sächsisch, um 1490, Laubholz © Skulpturensammlung, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden
 - Bild öffnet sich in einer Vergrößerungsansicht.
  • Mondsichelmadonna, Sächsisch, um 1520, Lindenholz © Skulpturensammlung, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden
 - Bild öffnet sich in einer Vergrößerungsansicht.
  • Breuer, Peter, Heiliger Christophorus aus Gersdorf bei Lugau, 1506, Laubholz und Nadelholz © Skulpturensammlung, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden - Bild öffnet sich in einer Vergrößerungsansicht.


The exhibition in the Schloßbergmuseum includes works, most of which are painted, from the most important centres of art production located between the rivers Saale and Neisse. They demonstrate the stylistic and iconographic range of Saxon wood sculpture carving and its connections with the art of neighbouring cultural regions.

The pictorial works which are devoted to themes such as the incarnation of Christ, depicted by means of the numerous figures of the Virgin and Child, and the salvation of man through the Passion, familiarise the visitor with the images and ideas of the mediaeval world and illustrate their wide-ranging use in the liturgy. The focal point of the exhibition, which comprises around 80 objects, including 65 from the holdings of the Skulpturen¬sammlung, is Late Gothic statuary art dating from the period between 1480 and 1520. Sculptures such as the two Madonnas by the Master H. W. from Waldkirchen, the large and emotionally charged statue of the Enthroned Virgin from Geyer, several works by Peter Breuer, and the monumental figures from the former high altar of the Michaeliskirche in Zeitz bear unique testimony to the heyday of Saxon wood sculpture carving.